Amish Tamworth Coppa


Posted on December 20th, by Frank Mirando in Fall, Meat, Preserving. 2 comments

 
Out of the whole pig, this is what I look forward to the most.   In Europe the coppa is the most prized cut and I can see why.  On a pig that was naturally raised like this Tamworth from Pleasant Pastures in Pa, the fat, to meat ratio is perfectly balanced.  Fresh, it makes for a wonderful roast or braise but if fermented and hung to dry at the right temperature and humidity…well, it’s a new animal all together.  Call me crazy but a properly cured seasoned and dried coppa is the most amazing salumi on the hog.  Sorry prosciutto!

You may notice this thing is super long, about 18 inches and its because I had the freedom of choosing where I wanted to cut the muscle.  A 5.5 pound cut like this is not attainable at any supermarket, trust me.  Seam butchery is amazing and will change the way you cook with pork, no doubt.

 
I can say over the past few years I have made a boat load of successful coppe.  After many experiments with different spice combo’s from all over Italy my favorite hands down is the classic calabrese preparation.  It cured for 15 days in kosher salt, cure #2, hot calabrese pepper powder, sweet calabrese pepper from Scott at the Sausage Debauchery.  Washed all the spices and salt with red wine and let it soak for about 15 minutes then pat it dry.  To dry it out I left it in the fridge uncovered overnight then rubbed it with a mix of hot, sweet calabrese powder and black pepper.  I really packed it in and let it hang out on the counter and absorb for about  1/2 hour before stuffing into the beef bung.
Stuffing this monstrosity in a beef bung was not a simple task.  I ripped a hole in the top of the bung but it shouldn’t be a problem.  After I tied it up good, i poured the mold solution over it a few times.  It hung in the fermentation chamber until a nice bloom developed, about 5 days.  Let me tell you between the bung and the mold it was…lets say ripe.  
 
 

This thing was so thick it should take quite a while to dry.  I expect to wait about 4-6 months but it will be worth it.  I will post some new pictures once it starts drying out and developing the white moldy loveliness!





2 Responses to “Amish Tamworth Coppa”

  1. Frank Napoli says:

    >Looking good! Thats going to be delicious!

  2. FrankieM says:

    >Thanks, it's so hard to wait the 6 months!

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